AusVeteran's FAQ's

We are lucky in Australia that many organisations offer support for mental health concerns. Some are specific to particular mental health conditions, some to veterans or other sub-sections of our community, and some are general, so anyone who needs support can contact them. If you’re not sure whom to call, start with one organisation, and they can direct you to others if necessary. Most of all, these organisations are full of people whose job is to support those in need. You can be sure to receive help from any of the following: 

The DVA does not provide an ‘average’ payout for any conditions, including tinnitus, as every claim is individually assessed. Compensation is based on several variables such as the severity of the condition, its impact on the individual’s quality of life, and their ability to work. Regarding tinnitus, the DVA would consider the degree of hearing loss and how it influences daily living and professional life. You can claim for initial liability for tinnitus; however, it is compensable as a hearing impairment only if it is accompanied by hearing loss. The DVA uses a complex set of guidelines to assess the percentage of impairment and the resulting compensation.  Although current rates for general pensions can be found on the DVA website, the rates can change and knowing which compensation table to reference for your particular injury or illness can be tricky. The only surefire way to discover the compensation you’re entitled to is by lodging a claim. Our team at AusVeterans is here to help facilitate this. We invite you to get in touch for free assistance today. 

Reference: 9.1.8 Hearing impairments | Military Compensation SRCA Manuals and Resources Library, Permanent Impairment Handbook, Ch 9 1930 Act, 9.1 Table of Injuries (dva.gov.au) 

Compensation for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) from the DVA, much like other conditions, doesn’t come as an ‘average’ payout. Each claim is assessed individually, considering the severity of the PTSD, its impact on the veteran’s daily life, and work capacity and the legislation under which the claim is submitted. For example, a veteran struggling with severe PTSD symptoms that drastically impact their life could be considered to have a higher impairment percentage than a veteran who is able to continue with their regular lifestyle with some adjustments. The compensation payable for PTSD also varies dependent on the legislation under which it is covered. 

Under the MRCA, a veteran with PTSD could receive up a fortnightly pension or an equivalent lump sum payment. Through the DRCA a veteran can only access a lump sum payment and with VEA, a veteran can only access a pension. Submitting a claim is the only sure method to ascertain your compensation amount. The team at AusVeterans is prepared to guide you through this process. Don’t hesitate to contact us for free support today. 

 

Like all other claimable conditions, the DVA does not provide an ‘average’ payout for anxiety. Each claim is assessed individually, carefully considering factors such as the severity of the anxiety, how it impacts the individual’s daily life, and their ability to work. Such information is retrieved from your ADF medical records. For information about how to access your medical records, you can read more here. Further, whether your claim is assessed under the MRCA, DRCA or VEA will determine the kind of compensation that is available to you. The MRCA offers lump sum compensation payments or pensions, or a combination of both. The VEA offers pensions only whereas the DRCA offers only lump sum compensation. The only way to determine your exact level of compensation is to put in a claim and have your claim assessed by DVA. At AusVeterans, we can help you with this. Contact us for free assistance today. 

Are you in need of immediate help for your PTSD? Contact Open Arms today and they can assist you with support for PTSD

There isn’t an ‘average’ payout for Lumbar Spondylosis, as the DVA takes into account various factors unique to each case when determining compensation. Factors considered include the severity of the condition and its effect on the veteran’s lifestyle and ability to work. Also a consideration is the legislation under which the claim is processed. For VEA claims, no lump sum is available as VEA only awards pensions. At the opposite end, DRCA only offers lump sum compensation. If your claim is being assessed under the MRCA legislation, you could be eligible for either a lump sum payment or a pension, or a combination of both. To definitively determine your compensation, you need to file a claim. We at AusVeterans, are ready to assist you in this process. Reach out to us for free help today. 

Like all other claimable conditions, the DVA does not provide an ‘average’ payout for anxiety. Each claim is assessed individually, carefully considering factors such as the severity of the anxiety, how it impacts the individual’s daily life, and their ability to work. Such information is retrieved from your ADF medical records. For information about how to access your medical records, you can read more here. Further, whether your claim is assessed under the MRCA, DRCA or VEA will determine the kind of compensation that is available to you. The MRCA offers lump sum compensation payments or pensions, or a combination of both. The VEA offers pensions only whereas the DRCA offers only lump sum compensation. The only way to determine your exact level of compensation is to put in a claim and have your claim assessed by DVA. At AusVeterans, we can help you with this. Contact us for free assistance today. 

Veterans can claim various forms of compensation through the Department of Veterans Affairs (DVA), designed to assist with conditions related to their service. This includes physical injuries, mental health conditions, diseases, and other health conditions that have caused permanent or partial impairment during or due to their service. It’s important to remember that a crucial part of the DVA claims process is establishing that your condition is indeed service-related; you may be eligible for various benefits, including medical care, rehabilitation, education, training, or income support if accepted. You can read more about what you can claim through DVA here. Once you have established that you have a claimable condition, you will need your defence medical records to prove that you suffered the injury or illness in order to prepare and lodge an initial liability claim. If you need clarification on your eligibility or free assistance making a claim, the team at AusVeterans is here to support you. Don’t navigate this journey alone; contact us today for personalised service. 

Processing a DVA claim involves several steps. First, you need to identify a health condition that you believe is related to your service. Next, gather supporting evidence for your claim. This could include defence medical reports, service records, or witness statements. Then, lodge your claim with the DVA using the most appropriate form based on your service and condition. Next, the DVA will assess your claim, potentially requesting further medical examinations or additional information. Lastly, a delegate from the DVA will review all the information and decide on your claim. More details about each step can be found here. This process can be complex and overwhelmingIf you require free professional assistance in processing a DVA claim, AusVeterans is ready to help. Reach out to us via our contact page. We can provide you free guidance and support to navigate this process effectively. 

The timeframe for processing DVA claims can vary based on several factors, including the complexity of the case, the type of claim, and the thoroughness of the submitted documentation. However, DVA assessors always aim to decide as quickly as possible. As per the Veterans’ Entitlements Act 1986 (VEA), the Safety, Rehabilitation and Compensation Act 1988 (SRCA), and the Military Rehabilitation and Compensation Act 2004 (MRCA), assessors strive to process claims within a 75-day standard timeframe, although some may take longer. Therefore, providing as much comprehensive evidence as possible to support your claim is essential, which can expedite the process. To learn more about the processing times for DVA claims, visit this link. If you’re feeling overwhelmed by the claims process, don’t worry – AusVeterans is here to offer free assistance and expertise. Contact our experienced team through our website, and let’s work together on your claim.

The amount of DVA payout varies depending on numerous factors, including the type and severity of the condition, its impact on daily life, and the specific legislation under which the claim is lodged. Per DVA’s guidelines, compensation could be provided through various pensions, benefits, or allowances. DVA has tables and guides on their website that may assist you to work out an approximate payout figure. You can find more information on the summary of pension rates, limits, and allowances page. It’s worth noting that these rates are updated regularly, and you should always ensure that you are looking at the most current information. The only way to accurately determine your rate of payout or pension is to lodge a claim. It’s ok if you don’t know how; the process can be complex and overwhelming. We know this and that’s why AusVeterans is here to help. Contact us via our contact page for free expert guidance and assistance to prepare your DVA claim.

The DVA doesn’t assign a set number of points to any specific condition, including Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). Instead, the DVA assesses each condition for its degree of impairment. This involves an examination of the extent to which the condition impacts your daily life and ability to work. The DVA uses a points system to represent this degree of impairment, with each point equivalent to 1% impairment. Therefore, a condition significantly impacting daily life could result in more points. In some cases, if a condition is causing at least a 10-point (or 10%) impairment, you may be eligible for interim compensation payments while your claim is being assessed. You can read more about the eligibility criteria for interim payments here. If you find understanding how your condition might be evaluated challenging, AusVeterans can guide you. Visit our website today and let us offer you free assistance with your DVA claim. 

The calculation of DVA compensation, specifically incapacity payments, is based on the difference between your average earnings (the amount you earned before your injury) and your actual earnings after you became incapable of working due to your condition. If you’re entirely unable to work, you are initially entitled to 100% of your normal earnings. As you return to work and begin to earn income, your compensation payment is progressively reduced until your actual earnings equal your normal earnings. It’s important to note that this calculation is subject to regular reviews and changes based on your work capacity and the legislation in effect. To delve deeper into the calculation of DVA incapacity payments, visit this link. If you need more clarification about how your compensation might be calculated or need help navigating your claim, contact AusVeterans via our website. Our team is ready to guide you through the process and help you understand what you’re entitled to at absolutely no cost to you.